Monthly Archives: February 2010

Gyeongju

Tips for Locals: Gyeongju Shopping Guide


View Gyeongju Shopping in a larger map

Since there are about 24 new foreign teachers starting this semester at my university this semester, I thought I’d take a few minutes to slap together a short shopping guide for Gyeongju’s local foreigners. It’s pouring down rain today, so please excuse me for not running out and shooting photos. I’m afraid we’ll just have to make do with Google Maps for the bling factor.  Anyhow, here are a few things most foreigners ask about when they move here:

English-Speaking Pharmacists

If you’re in need of an English-speaking pharmacist, there’s one who runs the Medipharm Dongguk Pharmacy right on Dongdae Sagori Intersection. I don’t remember her name at the moment, but she’s quite fluent in English (her husband’s foreign, I believe) and real friendly. If she’s not in when you go by, her assistant might give her a ring if it’s an emergency. read more »

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Gyeongju hiking Namsan-dong Statues & carvings Temples & shrines tips for tourists

Hiking Route: Chilbulam Hermitage (칠불암)

Chilbulam Hermitage (칠불암)

Chilbulam Hermitage (칠불암)

 I’ve been running this blog now for almost 3 months and it’s nearly criminal I’ve not said anything yet about Mt. Namsan (남산) as I think it’s one of the coolest things about Gyeongju. Mt. Namsan’s not nearly as tall as some of the mountains around here (just under 500 meters actually) but what makes it so special is that it’s covered with over 100 stone Buddha’s and other Shilla Dynasty relics dating back about 1,500 years.  It’s also got some pretty gnarly rock formations and a fair share of Buddhist temples, which can make for some fun hikes.  read more »

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Buddhist culture Stories, legends & people Temples & shrines

Parable of the Ox Herder (심우도)

Parable of the Ox-herder, Okryeongam Hermitage

Parable of the Ox-herder, Okryeongam Hermitage

Okay, I admit it:  I’m a Korean temple junky.  Big or small, I get a kick out of visiting Buddhist temples over here.   Maybe It’s because they’re something excotic we don’t have back home (and no, Yogaville doesn’t count) or just that I find them very relaxing places to be.   But whatever your religious preferences,  Buddhist temples here are a pretty unique expression of Korea’s traditional culture and spiritual heritage.   read more »

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