Tag Archives: shopping

Arts & crafts Events Festivals Hwangseong-dong photography shopping tips for tourists

2011 Gyeongju Ceramics Festival Photos

Gyeongju Ceramics Festival

Gyeongju Ceramics Festival

Somehow I always forget about the annual Gyeongju Shilla Ceramics Festival. It’s not that I hate Korean pottery or anything. (In fact, I’m a proud owner of several Korean tea sets). Rather, the fine folks over at Gyeongju’s City Hall always double book the Ceramics Festival along side other big events (which actually isn’t as daft as it might seem since it helps draw in the crowds). In years past it ran literally next to the Liquor and Rice Cake Festival in Hwanseong Park. This year however it’s providing a nice cultural courter point to the adrenaline fueled Taekwondo Championships next door in Hwangseong Gymnasium. There seem to be a lot more artists at the Ceramics Festival then in years past and they’ve got a few hands on activities for the youngsters, as well as other types of traditional crafts for sale. The Ceramics Festival runs through this weekend and finishes up on Sunday the May 8th, a few days longer then the WTF Championships. If your around, check it out as it’s a great opportunity for some early Christmas (or belated Mother’s Day) shopping. read more »

Share
Arts & crafts Gyeongju Shamanism tips for tourists Wierd Gyeongju

Wierd Gyeongju: Mr. Seo, Penis Carver of Mt. Namsan (남산나무꾼)

Penis Carver, Mt. Namsan, Gyeongju

Penis Carver, Mt. Namsan, Gyeongju

There are many times in this country when I’ve wished I had a better grasp of the Korean language.  Standing in Mr. Seo Seung-am’s workshop at the foot of Mt. Namsan (남산) was definitely one of those times.  On display all over the shop are literally hundreds of hand-carved wooden penises.  There are big ones, small ones, some with faces, and some with breasts.  There are penis coat racks, penis hiking sticks, penis hat racks and penis chairs.  Heck, some of the penises even have penises.  I would simply like to ask Mr. Seo “Why?” read more »

Share
Arts & crafts Buddhist culture Downtown Gyeongju Gyo-dong shopping tips for tourists

Gyeongju Shopping Guide: Part 2 What to buy?

Continued from Part 1…

Pottery Shop, Gyeongju

Pottery Shop, Gyeongju

If you’re shopping for gifts or personal mementos in Korea, there are a lot of options.  You could get something functional, like a hand-made tea pot or a brass ware dinner set.  Or, if you’re searching for something ornamental, take a look at the calligraphy scrolls or hand-carved wood work.  The fashion conscious might want to try a Korean “Handbok” dyed with traditional Korean pigments, like Je-ju mud.  However, if you’re looking for something more unique or unusual, here are a few suggestions: read more »

Share
Arts & crafts Bomun Resort Downtown Gyeongju shopping tips for tourists

Gyeongju Shopping Guide: Part 1 Where to Shop?

Folkcraft Village, Gyeongju

Folkcraft Village, Gyeongju

Christmas time is just a few months away, which means (for a lot of folks in my country anyways) that it’s time to start shopping for presents.  Korea offers some very unique and interesting gift options for folks back home and I’m not just talking about the kimchi chocolate or plastic fans that you can buy in the airport.  In places like Insa-dong in Seoul you can find everything from Korean antiques and calligraphy to hand-made pottery and high quality green tea.  What you may not know is that Gyeongju is also a great place for gift shopping, and you can usually find things here for a lot cheaper than in the big cities.  The trick is knowing where to shop and what to buy. read more »

Share
Downtown Food & drink Gyeongju restaurants shopping tips for tourists

Restaurant Review #14: Ah Sa Ga Tea House (아사가찻집)

Ah Sa Ga Tea house, Downtown Gyeongju

Ah Sa Ga Teahouse, Downtown Gyeongju

As we’ve been on the topic of tea lately, I figure it’s about time that I post on Ah Sa Ga Tea House (아사가찻집).  Ah Sa Ga is in the middle of Gyeongju’s downtown shopping district, on Bonhwang-ro Culture Street (봉황로).    It’s been open for almost a decade, though I only discovered it a little bit ago myself.   For years, I thought it was a pottery shop, which I hope is excusable as they do actually display and sell tea sets in the front of their shop. read more »

Share
Gyeongju tips for tourists

Tips for Tourists: Changing Money in Gyeongju

Korea Exchange Bank (image from www.thislondon.co.uk)

Korea Exchange Bank (image from www.thislondon.co.uk)

Having worked in Gyeongju for over 5 years, all of my banking’s done in Korea, so it’s been a while since I’d had to deal with the trouble of changing money or withdrawing cash from an international account.  A while that is, until this afternoon.   My folks are currently visiting from the States, so we walked downtown with hopes of a hassle-free banking experience. read more »

Share
Gyeongju Namsan-dong Other Sites to see tips for tourists

Off the Beaten Path: The Gyeongsangbukdo Botanical Gardens (경상북도산림환경연구소)

Bonsai Tree, Botanical Gardens, Gyeongju

Bonsai Tree, Botanical Gardens, Gyeongju

In the eastern shadow of Mt. Namsan (남산), just a few minutes up the road from Tongiljeon Shrine (통일전), is one of the more unique tourist attractions in the area:  the Gyeongsangbuk-do Botanical Gardens (경상북도산림환경연구소).  Even though it has nothing to do with ancient tombs, stone Buddhas or the Shilla Dynasty, the Botanical Gardens are well worth a taking a few hours to explore.  With over 100 acres of woodlands, trails and gardens, it’s a great spot for a romantic walk or an afternoon picnic.  And if you’re traveling with kids, it’s the perfect place for them to run around and get some energy out.  It’s got enough curious attractions that they won’t get bored either. read more »

Share
Korean culture links News Outside Gyeongju shopping websites

Even More Links

It’s been a while since I’ve updated the links here on Gyeongjublog, so here’s a quick run down on sites I’ve run across lately that are worth checking out. To kick things off, it seems the KTO’s (Korean Tourism Organization) got a new interactive map of Korea  that kicks Google Map’s butt. It looks prettier, has more information, and most importantly: it’s in English! Unfortunately, you can’t do cool things with it like plot your hiking routes on it or imbed it in your website, so I guess I’ll be sticking with Google Maps here for a little while longer.

For a lot of Westerners Feng Shui, or Pungsu-jiri (풍수지리) in Korean, ranks right up there with fan death and acid rain causing baldness. For most Koreans, however, it governs matters as serious as where to bury your parents and wheather or not Seoul’s colonial era City Hall should be demolished. Whether you’re a believer or a skeptic, David Mason has a fascinating page on the history and basic concepts governing Korean Pungsu-jiri . It’s part of his broader website: san-shin.org , which is so cool that I’ll be giving it a more indepth review here shortly. read more »

Share
Arts & crafts Downtown Gyeongju Korean culture shopping tips for tourists

Phoenix Street of Traditional Culture (봉황로)

Phoenix Street of Traditional Culture, Downtown Gyeongju

Phoenix Street of Traditional Culture, Downtown Gyeongju

With the KTX slated to start running to Gyeongju by next Winter(fingers crossed), there’s been a lot of hustle and bustle around town lately  If you’re local you may have noticed there’s been a lot of construction downtown over this last year.  Seems the city decided to give a serious makeover to the pottery and antiques street, just a block over from McDonalds and Baskin Robbins. read more »

Share
Gyeongju

Tips for Locals: Gyeongju Shopping Guide


View Gyeongju Shopping in a larger map

Since there are about 24 new foreign teachers starting this semester at my university this semester, I thought I’d take a few minutes to slap together a short shopping guide for Gyeongju’s local foreigners. It’s pouring down rain today, so please excuse me for not running out and shooting photos. I’m afraid we’ll just have to make do with Google Maps for the bling factor.  Anyhow, here are a few things most foreigners ask about when they move here:

English-Speaking Pharmacists

If you’re in need of an English-speaking pharmacist, there’s one who runs the Medipharm Dongguk Pharmacy right on Dongdae Sagori Intersection. I don’t remember her name at the moment, but she’s quite fluent in English (her husband’s foreign, I believe) and real friendly. If she’s not in when you go by, her assistant might give her a ring if it’s an emergency. read more »

Share
Content Protected Using Blog Protector By: PcDrome.