Tag Archives: Wonhyo

Book Reviews Buddhist culture history Stories, legends & people websites

Silla Buddhism: New Translations of Masters Wonhyo (원효) and Uisang (의상) in the “Collected Works of Korean Buddhism”

Wonhyo's Awakening, Seonggwangsa Temple

Wonhyo’s Awakening, Seonggwangsa Temple

Maybe only Korean history enthusiasts or Buddhism geeks like me get excited over this sort of thing, but last year saw the publication of a document of great significance for western scholars of both Korean history and East-Asian Buddhism.  In the summer of 2012 the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism released a critical edition of the Hanguk Bulgyo Jeonseo, or “Collected Works of Korean Buddhism,” translated into English.  Not only that, but all 13 volumes are free to download in high-quality .pdf format.  Two volumes of this publication in particular concern the lives and work of the Silla Buddhist Masters Wonhyo  (원효) and Uisang (의상) and are thus significant contributions to the western study of Buddhism during Gyeongju’s famed Silla Dynasty.  read more »

Share
Blog News Downtown East Sea Gyeongju Gyo-dong News Ruins & remains Temples & shrines

Blog Reboot Summer 2013

Gyo-dong Folk Village, Gyeongju

Gyo-dong Folk Village, Gyeongju

To start off my first post in almost a year, I’d like to apologize to all those folks who’ve posted comments and questions to this blog over the last several months.  I’ve basically been busy as hell this last year, so I hope to breath a second wind into the blog here over the next few months (time willing).  Over this last year, I’ve written the first draft of my thesis for my Masters in Buddhist Studies which, incidentally, involves research into the Silla  Kings Beopheung and Jinheung.  Also, I’ve coauthored a three part series on Gyeognju’s Mt. Namsan (click here to read part 2 and part 3) for the Jogye Order’s English language quarterly, Buddhism and Culture, plus an academic article surveying the life and work of the famed Silla monk, Ven. Wonhyo.  As of last February I changed both my job and  MA program.  Most importantly, however, this last March our second son was born, so everything non-essential has gotten pushed to the side since then.  I hope all the commentors that I’m just now getting back to would be so kind as to forgive this weary grad student, teacher and father for the late reply. read more »

Share
Arts & crafts Buddhist culture Gyeongju history Statues & carvings Stories, legends & people Temples & shrines Wierd Gyeongju

Wierd Gyeongju: The Wooden Fish Knocker of Bunhwangsa (분황사) Temple

Wooden Fish Knocker, Bunhwangsa Temple, Gyeongju

Wooden Fish Knocker, Bunhwangsa Temple, Gyeongju

As one of the few architectural structures left standing from the Silla Dynasty, Bunhwangsa (분황사) Temple is one of the “must see” historical sites in Gyeongju.  Built in 634 C.E. by order of the legendary Queen Seondeok (선덕여왕), Bunhwangsa is most famous for its three-tiered pagoda.  Originally built as seven or nine tiers, the pagoda was badly damaged during both the Mongolian Invasions of the 13th century, when the neighboring Hwangnyeongsa Temple (황룡사) and nine-story pagoda were burned to the ground, and again during the Hideyoshi Invasion of 1592.  Curiously, the pagoda was built in “imitation brick” style, meaning that Silla workmen actually took the time to carve stones into the shapes of bricks to imitate the brick pagodas then fashionable in China.  Seems to me like it would’ve been a lot easier to make it out of actual bricks, but I’ll leave the debate over that minor detail up to the historians. read more »

Share
Bomun Resort East Sea Festivals Gyeongju hiking Hwangseong-dong Temples & shrines tips for tourists

Gyeongju Weekend Events: G20, Golgulsa Festival & Moonlight Walk

 

G20 Comes to Bomun Resort (image from english.yonhapnews.co.kr/)

G20 Comes to Bomun Resort (image from english.yonhapnews.co.kr/)

Bomun Resort G20 Summit

This weekend is going to be a bit crazy around Gyeongju.  There’s a lot of stuff going on, and some of it sounds pretty cool (and some of it not really).  For starters, we’ve all heard about the G20 kicking off in Seoul, but you might not know that there’s a separate G20 summit going down this weekend at Gyeongju’s own Bomun Lake Resort.  This summit is reserved solely for the C.F.O.s of the member countries and will focus primarily on tweaking the nuts and bolts of the global economy. read more »

Share
Buddhist culture News Outside Gyeongju Temples & shrines

Hyangiram Hermitage (향일암) Lost in Fire

Hyangiram Hermitage Fire (from Joongang Daily)

Hyangiram Hermitage Fire (from Joongang Daily)

I heard some rather sad news when I got home today.  It seems that Hyangiram (향일암), literally “Sunrise Hermitage”, in Yeosu burned down last night.  I used to live in Gwangyang, near Yeosu and first visited Hyangiram back in ’02.    I’ve been there twice since and I think it is (or sadly was) one of the coolest places I’ve been to in Korea. read more »

Share
Stories, legends & people websites

Links: The Hwarang (화랑) Warriors of the Shilla Dynasty

 

Hwarang Warrior (from wikipedia.org)

Hwarang Warrior (from wikipedia.org)

 

I was going to include this with my new links  post a few days back, but it was so cool I figured it need a posting of it’s own.   Last week I stumbled onto the official website of the Hwarang Do martial arts organization .  If you’ve read anything about the history of the Shilla Dynasty,  you probably ran across at least something about the Hwarang (화랑).

“Hwarang” literally means, “flower youth,” but these guys were the farthest thing from pansies.  The Hwarang were an elite body of aristocratic Shilla youth who trained in the arts military strategy and hand-to-hand combat.  They were also at the top of  Shilla  scholastics and  were well versed in Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, literature, poetry and even music and dance.  Many great figures from the mid to late Shilla period were Hwarang, like General Kim Yu-shin (김유신), who unified the 3 kingdoms, and the Buddhist saints Wonhyo  (원효) and Uisang (의상).

read more »

Share
Stories, legends & people

St. Wonhyo’s Awakening

Portrait of St. Wonhyo at Bunhwangsa Temple (from the internet)

Portrait of St. Wonhyo, Bunhwangsa Temple (from Google images)

The are a lot of great stories and legends from the Shilla dynasty.   Most have to do with places around Gyeongju, so I’m hoping to retell a few of them here.  Bunhwangsa temple was the home of one of the most famous Korean Buddhist saints of all time, Venerable monk Wonhyo (617 – 686 CE) .   St. Wonhyo is known and respected for a lot of reasons and there are some pretty wild stories about his antics, but I figure I’ll start with the story of his Great Awakening. read more »

Share
Content Protected Using Blog Protector By: PcDrome.